The London Moment. Transnational Collaboration of Governments-in-exile during the Second World War and ist Impact in European History


When the Nazis conquered the continent in 1939/1940, political elites from all over Europe fled to Great Britain, last remaining safe haven of the Allies in reachable distance. Most European governments whose territory was now being occupied by Nazi Germany moved to London. A significant number of them had arrived as individual refugees, but once in London, they revived former contacts and created new networks to set up the mechanics of national committees and governments-in-exile, but also to continue political collaboration on an international level.


Principal Investigators
Eichenberg, Julia Dr. (Details) (History of Western Europe and Transatlantic Relationships)

Duration of Project
Start date: 09/2014
End date: 12/2021

Publications
Julia Eichenberg/Benjamin Lahusen/Marcus M. Payk/Kim Christian Priemel, Eine Maschine, die träumt. Das Recht in der Zeitgeschichte und die Zeitgeschichte des Rechts, in: Zeithistorische Forschungen/Studies in Contemporary History, Online-Ausgabe, 16 (2019), H. 2,
URL: https://zeithistorische-forschungen.de/2-2019/5719,
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14765/zzf.dok-1525,
Druckausgabe: S. 215-231.

Julia Eichenberg, London Calling. Adressbücher des britischen Exils im Zweiten Weltkrieg, in: Zeithistorische Forschungen/Studies in Contemporary History, Online-Ausgabe, 16 (2019), H. 2,
URL: https://zeithistorische-forschungen.de/2-2019/5734,
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14765/zzf.dok-1516,
Druckausgabe: S. 363-374.

Julia Eichenberg, Macht auf der Flucht. Europäische Regierungen in London (1940–1944), in: Zeithistorische Forschungen/Studies in Contemporary History, Online-Ausgabe, 15 (2018), H. 3,
URL: https://zeithistorische-forschungen.de/3-2018/5614,
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14765/zzf.dok.4.1291,
Druckausgabe: S. 452-473.

Last updated on 2021-08-02 at 23:05