Effects and Underlying Mechanisms of a Probiotic on Porcine Adaptive Immune Cells


Previous experiments have shown that dietary addition of Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 (E. faecium) led to higher relative amounts of cytotoxic T cells in the gut associated immune system of weaned piglets. The proposed research project will following up previous findings with controlled in vitro experiments on primary cultured porcine immune cells to uncover if the in vivo identified E. faecium effects are based on direct or indirect mechanisms. The planned experiments will contribute to the identification of pathways, affected genes or transcripts of primary cultured porcine lymphocytes that are regulated by E. faecium and the verification of the activation of cytotoxic T cells after addition of E. faecium as a mechanism contributing to protection to viral infection. E. faecium will be applied in different concentrations and forms. To complement the search for mechanisms of action, the role of miRNAs involved in the action of feed additives on signaling pathways in the host will be studied. The results will add new insights into an important area of “immunonutrition” by feed additives.
Previous experiments have shown that dietary addition of Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 (E. faecium) led to higher relative amounts of cytotoxic T cells in the gut associated immune system of weaned piglets. The proposed research project will following up previous findings with controlled in vitro experiments on primary cultured porcine immune cells to uncover if the in vivo identified E. faecium effects are based on direct or indirect mechanisms. The planned experiments will contribute to the identification of pathways, affected genes or transcripts of primary cultured porcine lymphocytes that are regulated by E. faecium and the verification of the activation of cytotoxic T cells after addition of E. faecium as a mechanism contributing to protection to viral infection. E. faecium will be applied in different concentrations and forms. To complement the search for mechanisms of action, the role of miRNAs involved in the action of feed additives on signaling pathways in the host will be studied. The results will add new insights into an important area of “immunonutrition” by feed additives.


Spokesperson
Kreuzer-Redmer, Susanne Dr. rer. agr. (Details) (Breeding Biology and Molecular Animal Breeding)

Duration of project
Start date: 02/2016
End date: 04/2019

Research Areas
Animal Husbandry, Breeding and Hygiene, Immunology, Veterinary Medical Science

Last updated on 2021-08-07 at 14:29