Progress in phenological modelling on the basis of metabolomic approaches


Modelling of phenological stages, such as the flowering of fruit trees, is based on temperature sums for many decades, describing both the chilling and the forcing requirements of woody plants until the beginning of flowering. These approaches go back to Reaumur (1735), who originally proposed the concept of "Growing Degree Days". Recently, there is a growing body of opinion that asks for new methods in phenological modelling and more in-depth studies on the dormancy of woody plants. This requirement is easily understandable if we consider the wide application of phenological models, which even can affect the results of climate models. To this day in phenological models, still a number of parameters must be optimized on observations, although some basic physiological knowledge of the chilling and forcing requirement of plants is already considered (semi-mechanistic approaches). Limiting, for a fundamental improvement of these models, is the lack of knowledge about the course of dormancy in woody plants, which cannot be directly observed and which is also insufficiently described in the literature. Modern metabolomic methods provide a solution for this problem and allow both the exact validation of currently used phenological models (Chmielewski et al. 2014) as well as the development of new mechanistic approaches. For this reason it is necessary to track changes in the concentration of selected phytohormones (abscisic acid) and their precursors (carotenoids) in high temporal resolution, in order to replace the currently optimized dates for the release of dormancy and the beginning of ontogenetic development by analytical results. Furthermore, the context of free amino acids with dormancy and the subsequent growth and development processes of flower buds will be derived. For new phenological modelling approaches changes of these metabolites (concentration, temporal course) must be set in relation to the variability of environmental parameters (weather, day length, etc.). This necessarily requires multi-year and high-resolution data of the dependency of the relevant substances on controlling environmental parameters. These studies are now feasible, but scientifically not implemented, yet. The feasibility of this approach has already been tested in a 2-year pilot-study on sweet cherries (Götz et al. 2014) and should be continued and intensified in the planned project. The suggested methodology is not only limited to the flowering of fruit trees, it can also be applied to tree species of the natural vegetation, where even greater deficits in phenological modelling exist.
Modelling of phenological stages, such as the flowering of fruit trees, is based on temperature sums for many decades, describing both the chilling and the forcing requirements of woody plants until the beginning of flowering. These approaches go back to Reaumur (1735), who originally proposed the concept of "Growing Degree Days". Recently, there is a growing body of opinion that asks for new methods in phenological modelling and more in-depth studies on the dormancy of woody plants. This requirement is easily understandable if we consider the wide application of phenological models, which even can affect the results of climate models. To this day in phenological models, still a number of parameters must be optimized on observations, although some basic physiological knowledge of the chilling and forcing requirement of plants is already considered (semi-mechanistic approaches). Limiting, for a fundamental improvement of these models, is the lack of knowledge about the course of dormancy in woody plants, which cannot be directly observed and which is also insufficiently described in the literature. Modern metabolomic methods provide a solution for this problem and allow both the exact validation of currently used phenological models (Chmielewski et al. 2014) as well as the development of new mechanistic approaches. For this reason it is necessary to track changes in the concentration of selected phytohormones (abscisic acid) and their precursors (carotenoids) in high temporal resolution, in order to replace the currently optimized dates for the release of dormancy and the beginning of ontogenetic development by analytical results. Furthermore, the context of free amino acids with dormancy and the subsequent growth and development processes of flower buds will be derived. For new phenological modelling approaches changes of these metabolites (concentration, temporal course) must be set in relation to the variability of environmental parameters (weather, day length, etc.). This necessarily requires multi-year and high-resolution data of the dependency of the relevant substances on controlling environmental parameters. These studies are now feasible, but scientifically not implemented, yet. The feasibility of this approach has already been tested in a 2-year pilot-study on sweet cherries (Götz et al. 2014) and should be continued and intensified in the planned project. The suggested methodology is not only limited to the flowering of fruit trees, it can also be applied to tree species of the natural vegetation, where even greater deficits in phenological modelling exist.


Principal investigators
Chmielewski, Frank-M. Prof. Dr. rer. nat. habil. (Details) (Agriculture and Plant Cultivation)

Duration of project
Start date: 07/2014
End date: 12/2017

Research Areas
Plant Sciences

Publications
Götz KP, Naher J, Fettke J, Chmielerwski FM (2018) Changes of proteins during dormancy and bud development of sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) Scientia Horticulturae 239, 41–49, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scienta.2018.05.016

Chmielewski FM, Baldermann S, Götz KP, Homann T, Gödeke K, Schumacher F, Huschek G, Rawel HM (2018) Abscisic Acid Related Metabolites in Sweet Cherry Buds (Prunus avium L.). J Hortic 5: 221. https://doi.org/10.4172/2376-0354.1000221 (open access)

Baldermann S, Homann T, Neugart S, Chmielewski FM, Götz KP, Gödeke K, Huschek G, Morlock GE Rawel HM (2018) Selected plant metabolites involved in oxidation-reduction processes during bud dormancy and ontogenetic development in sweet cherry buds (Prunus avium L.). Molecules 2: 1197, https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23051197 (open access)

Chmielewski FM, Götz KP (2017) Identification and Timing of Dormant and Ontogenetic Phase for Sweet Cherries in Northeast Germany for Modelling Purposes. J Hortic 4: 205. https://doi.org/10.4172/2376-0354.1000205 (open access)

Chmielewski FM, Götz KP, Homann T, Huschek G, Rawel HM (2017) Identification of endodormancy release for cherries (Prunus avium L.) by absisic acid and sugrars. J Hortic 4: 210. https://doi.org/10.4172/2376-0354.1000210 (open access)

Götz KP, Chmielewski FM, Gödeke K, Wolf K, Jander E, Sievers S, Homann T, Huschek G, Rawel HM (2017) Assessment of amino acids during winter rest and ontogenetic development in sweet cherry buds (Prunus avium L.). Scientia Horticulturae 222: 102-110

Chmielewski FM, Götz KP (2016) Performance of models for the beginning of sweet cherry blossom under current and changed climate conditions. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 218–219: 85–91

Götz KP, Chmielewski FM, Homann T, Huschek G, Matzneller P, Rawel HM (2014): Seasonal changes of physiological parameters in sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) buds. Scientia Horticulturae 172:183-190

Last updated on 2022-08-09 at 19:08